Posts Tagged ‘landscape’

Haro Wedding | Hillsboro Lighthouse | South Florida Wedding Photography

May 12th, 2014

All little girls grow up dreaming of their wedding day. Some more than others, but still the same, you have an idea or two before you ever get the proposal. Living in Florida the dream day is usually imagined with blue waters, white sand, a crisp sky, a colorful sunset and the picture perfect moment. […]

 

All little girls grow up dreaming of their wedding day. Some more than others, but still the same, you have an idea or two before you ever get the proposal. Living in Florida the dream day is usually imagined with blue waters, white sand, a crisp sky, a colorful sunset and the picture perfect moment. The Haro wedding checked all the boxes and then some. Mother Nature dealt us quite the hand this beautiful Saturday… except maybe the wind.

We could have done with a little less hurricane-force gusts that day, although when you are looking through the following images you will have no idea that we were battling it. The wind is definitely something most people do not think about when planning any sort of outdoor event. It sneaks up on you the moment of the big day and suddenly you are concerned about this particular force that you hadn’t even known was charted on your weather app. But I digress.

We arrived on the shores of Hillsboro beach, at the very point where there sits a lighthouse. Lighthouses are particular meaningful to Lisa and Kenny as they promised they would wed each other in front of one. <3 As our groom is a member of the United States Coast Guard, the house guarding the coastal shores also serves as a protecting beacon and symbol. We would like to take a small moment and thank both Kenny and Lisa; Kenny, thank you for serving our country and for the personal sacrifices you make to keep us all safe.


This very special day was filled with so many smiles, so much color, and many, many cheers. As we gazed back at this absolutely perfect day for Lisa and Kenny we both couldn’t help but smile to ourselves. These two are so in love and so perfect for each other. They truly are meant to share their lives together.

Happy Wedding Day Lisa and Kenny! Enjoy!

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shades of grey.

June 19th, 2013

We have been given quite an array of assignments working with the University of Central Florida’s College of Medicine; capturing a variety of both style and subject matter to appease their needs. Elation streaked across our faces when we were asked to tour Lake Nona and provide an artistic rendering of the newly built community. […]

 

We have been given quite an array of assignments working with the University of Central Florida’s College of Medicine; capturing a variety of both style and subject matter to appease their needs. Elation streaked across our faces when we were asked to tour Lake Nona and provide an artistic rendering of the newly built community.

A variety of home styles and structures exist within this region. We started on the North end and traveled through NorthLake Park, a community which sits on a hefty portion of land [500 acres to be exact] and boasts “excellent amenities including an award-winning A-rated elementary school, YMCA, and a neighborhood dog park.”

The Laureate Park community was still under construction as we were passing through but the style of homes found in this Eastern region seemed to gratify the most modern architects taste. From surprising colors on the homes to the futuristic features of this district, you can be sure your jaw will drop as you wander through.

To be a truly modern community restaurants and retailers should be easily accessible from your home. Not only has Lake Nona met this need, they have designed the buildings to mesh with the style of the area and provided a beautiful central location for the surrounding residents.

We then ventured toward the crowning jewel… Medical City. Perched on the southern end of Lake Nona is a workhorse of brilliant minds coupled with technology.

It’s been called a new chapter in Orlando’s history. The 650-acre health and life sciences park…is a landmark for Orlando and a premier location for medical care, research and education. Carefully planned and laid out, Lake Nona Medical City represents a deliberate strategy to create a centralized focus of sophisticated medical treatment, research and education in Central Florida.

Based on the proven theory that a cluster of healthcare and bioscience facilities in proximity to one another will accelerate innovation, this intellectual hub opened in a coordinated fashion with a collaborative mission. In the next decade, Lake Nona Medical City will be home to some of the nation’s top hospitals, universities, research institutions and life science companies. But already, the Medical City’s pioneering institutions are forming networks and synergies making Orlando a global destination for health care, research and medical education while creating an economic development and job creation engine for the region.

Source: Learn Lake Nona Website

Nemours Children Hospital
Nemours brings their comprehensive children’s healthcare and research capabilities to the forefront of the emerging health and science sector of Central Florida. It also strategically places Nemours Children’s Hospital and research campus within walking distance of the other influential institutions, facilities and companies located within Lake Nona Medical City, increasing the potential for beneficial collaboration.

Veteran’s Affair Hospital
The VA Medical Center at Lake Nona will be the first VA hospital to be built in the United States since 1995. The medical center will include at 134-bed inpatient diagnostic and treatment hospital, a 118-bed nursing home, a 60-bed domiciliary, an outpatient clinic, a veterans benefit mini service center and generous patient and visitor parking.

Sanford | Burnham Medical Research Institute
For more than 30 years, Sanford-Burnham has conducted world-class collaborative research dedicated to finding cures for disease and improving quality of life. The company selected Lake Nona as its site for a new east coast research facility and will employ over 300 scientists.

UF Research Center
The University of Florida, the oldest and largest public university in the state has decided to locate a research facility at Lake Nona Medical City. The 100,000 square-foot facility will be located next to the Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute at Lake Nona and will enable the university to have direct collaboration opportunities with Sanford-Burnham Institute’s top scientists.

We had such a grand afternoon exploring this new community in Orlando and strongly recommend each and every one of you to take a drive to this incredible place. All information provided in this article was taken from the Learn Lake Nona website and can provide additional details to the curious reader.

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The Meet & Shoot.

January 6th, 2011

Sometimes I take small voyages home for brief intervals in time, it is during these ventures that I find most of my photography is done while enjoying the solitude of me, myself and I. South Florida is perfect, with its serene laid back vibes and breezy beach side living; on occasion I’m quite convinced the […]

 


Sometimes I take small voyages home for brief intervals in time, it is during these ventures that I find most of my photography is done while enjoying the solitude of me, myself and I. South Florida is perfect, with its serene laid back vibes and breezy beach side living; on occasion I’m quite convinced the sun just gleams brighter there too. You know, I’m even certain my camera is stunned by the melodic rustling of palm leaves and the exfoliating sea salty air which always seem to hit the right notes.


On one such visit I decided my quality bonding time with the city of my childhood would be nice with a bit of companionship. Spontaneity led me to meet up with a fellow photographer who also happened to be an acquaintance from my middle school days. Most wonderful about having a photographer as a friend is the camaraderie and understanding you share, because we all identify with patience being of good worth.


You are thereby capable of taking a suitable amount of time necessary in both scoping out landscapes and capturing a precise scene. Photography is based on foresight and is as unpredictable as the blossoming of acquaintances into friends. Nina runs Ninaru [link here] and she’s a budding freelance photographer, much like Ashley and I also trying to carve her niche in this much saturated market.


What is an artist without a bit of practice? We took to the streets of sun-drenched Riverwalk in Ft. Lauderdale where we unreservedly strolled, cameras on straps dangling from the nape of our necks soon passing waterfront dining, shopping and cultural attractions. Most of the beaten paths we skipped on were deserted midday so the images we took were without flesh and skin, atypical of each of our work.


The challenge thereby presented itself in capturing nature and structures, in a quiet yet still vantage point. In fact shooting landscapes required me to step out of my comfort zone of performing with a narrow depth of field; here, I had to ditch this technique. I was forced to lessen the amount of light entering the camera, done by increasing to higher apertures thereby permitting everything in the scene to come into focus. It was definitely a learning experience and one that I am aching to experiment more on with Ashley.


We traveled within buildings, over railroads and beneath overpasses, until Nina and I stumbled into the jackpot location for potential shoots as the panorama of said scene was spectacular. Here there were colossal rock formations in the shape of perfectly rotund cheese wheels. The brilliant reflections bouncing amongst the encircling buildings were awe-inspiring, make-you-want-to-reach-for-the-bright-blue-sky kind of dazzling.



How gracefully the sun decided to bathe me with its light while that sea salty breeze coyly lifted the hem of my skirt making it dance about. We ladies shared boisterous laughter knowing the people behind those glass walls were very well scrutinizing our playful antics. We just as soon ran through the empty, grassy core between the cheese wheels and austere structures to chimp behind each others’ cameras.

From tips to tricks we covered those topics we had both been itching to discuss; photo walks are such a beautiful necessity. No sooner had I safely come to the conclusion that photographers utilizing Nikons make just as good of friends as those who fire off Canons. ;-)

Thanks for the play date Nina, let’s do it again soon!

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Beauty & The Beast.

December 7th, 2010

I often go to the forest, the woods, not only as a means of escape but to reconnect with the spiritual side of myself. To explore new grounds, breathe fresh air, and taste the freedom of a simple walk. Most people know that including some aspect of nature in their daily lives is pertinent, yet […]

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I often go to the forest, the woods, not only as a means of escape but to reconnect with the spiritual side of myself. To explore new grounds, breathe fresh air, and taste the freedom of a simple walk. Most people know that including some aspect of nature in their daily lives is pertinent, yet so few of us interact with the outdoors in the manor in which we should…myself included. So on a recent adventure to the great state of Georgia, I was surprised to find myself attracted to the man-made silos that stood on the grounds of our secret hide-a-way. Maybe it was the sun rays that struck against the rusting elements of the tall pillars, that caught my attention, or maybe it was the fact that although we still maintain the elements around these huge structures, we have abandoned them, let them fade into the background. And through these thoughts, another idea occurred to me, what about this scene that I am witnessing is so beautiful, and what is really the monster here?

Nature tends to mock everything mankind has ever achieved, not in an obvious way, but in a slow and tedious effort. Her tears wash over the skin of our creations, only to cause a chemical reaction that induces the breakdown of the anatomical structure…not at first, but over time. And time himself can be so cruel, to make it seem like we are but a second on his eternal watch, he mocks us more loudly than his counterpart. But still, Mother sends her organic, microbial creatures, after her tears, seen only by the eyes that look very closely. A tiny green tint is spotted upon the spokes of the wheels, a small army invading a space perceived as abandoned. Which is more beautiful? Who is the monster, nature for destroying the accomplishments of mankind or is it the accomplishments themselves that are so cruel, no longer are their purposes needed and yet they do not go away, they just stand in their place waiting.

The combination of industrial objects and nature are so breathtaking and awe inspiring we can only imagine the distorted relationship that they hold. Do we mock the sky by trying to reach its heights, or are we simply honoring is grandeur and splendor by emulating what we see? Is it beauty that I have been captivated by or is it the beast that lies below the appearances?

As I stumbled around the silos, I came across this particular piece of machinery. It stood for such a long time, loyal in it’s duty, but as you can see, it is losing the battle quicker than it’s brothers. It’s not even a captive, no chance of winning, it must just stand firm and endure the breakdown of its elements by forces much stronger than itself.

It seems so twisted and wrong, and yet I’ve never noticed til now.
And all I can do is admire the beauty of this beast.

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a symbol of liberty.

June 10th, 2010

More than 2.5 million people a year visit the 4.2 acre complex known worldwide as “The Alamo.” Most come to see the old mission where a small band of Texans held out for thirteen days against the Centralist army of General Antonio López de Santa Anna. Although the Alamo fell in the early morning hours […]

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More than 2.5 million people a year visit the 4.2 acre complex known worldwide as “The Alamo.” Most come to see the old mission where a small band of Texans held out for thirteen days against the Centralist army of General Antonio López de Santa Anna. Although the Alamo fell in the early morning hours of March 6, 1836, the death of the Alamo Defenders has come to symbolize courage and sacrifice for the cause of Liberty. The memories of James Bowie, David Crockett, and William B. Travis are as powerful today as when the Texan Army under Sam Houston shouted “Remember the Alamo!” as it routed Santa Anna at the battle of San Jacinto on April 21, 1836.
Source: Daughters of the Republic

Going to the Alamo, I wasn’t sure what to expect. In my mind I had envisioned a huge building with many rooms, and a stone wall so strong it would be seen as invincible. I imagined the location to be quiet, with the only building standing in the middle of the desert to be the Alamo. Winds whipping the sand all around, and each person to make the drive would be revered by the sight of the building standing once they came upon it.

Well, some of my imaginings came true… but mostly it was a fantasy I had created from watching old movies of Davy Crockett and singing songs about he and the Alamo as a child. I think i shouted “Remember the Alamo!” one too many times while we were there. (smiles)

Sadly the building was in the middle of downtown San Antonio, and was surrounded by modern buildings, lots of greenery, and the hustle and bustle of everyday happenings, not quite as elegant as I would have liked, but it was still such a spectacular place to see. An ancient building, filled with such bravery and conquest, swallowed by the result of the war fought on her very soil…it was rather romantic and poetic. The experience was definitely one to embrace, and so we slowly trekked towards it.

 

 

Be silent friend, here heroes died to blaze a trail for other men. ~Engraved on the door of the Alamo

We were not allowed to photograph the inside of the Alamo, but beyond the outer walls were merely three rooms filled with memorabilia from Davy Crockett, James Bowie, and other war heroes. The doors to James Bowie’s mansion rested inside the Alamo, which strangely enough was very intimidating. The walls were not the impenetrable that I had imagined, they were made of limestone, and disintegrated at the very touch of them. Strangely enough, many people had signed the walls of the Alamo, carving their names into it with a stick or knife. I asked how old these carvings were and the guide replied they had been on the walls for hundreds of years. I can only imagine a dying solider wanting to mark the place where he was last so his loved ones would know what had become of him. Or the arrogant people, who knew history would remember this place and so wanted to be a part of it forever….whatever the story, there were many names carved into this sacred place. We visitors got to leave our mark as well, in a Guest Book at the back of the room. It wasn’t much, but we were able to say that, “We were here. Remember us.”

Although my expectations were high, they were indeed met, and the spirit of the Alamo was just as grand as the imagination could expect. Thank you to all who fought for this country and allowed us to live in this great nation. Thank you those who lost their lives here in this place called the Alamo.

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“etude of the sun”

May 12th, 2010

I’ve recently become enamored by the light [or lack thereof] emitted during sunsets. Its illustrious shadows tiptoeing and sliding away like dancing apparitions upon every item they caress. And while these dark shapes are only half of what makes photographing sunsets intriguing, the whimsy thus materializes in their mirror image. The eruption of hues displayed […]

 


I’ve recently become enamored by the light [or lack thereof] emitted during sunsets. Its illustrious shadows tiptoeing and sliding away like dancing apparitions upon every item they caress. And while these dark shapes are only half of what makes photographing sunsets intriguing, the whimsy thus materializes in their mirror image. The eruption of hues displayed from the spectrum of colors are distinctive, a work of art so delicious you could imagine was finger painted with tubs of sorbet. Images come to life in light of day’s end.

It inevitably vanishes but I continue to wait for the hour when I can gather my gear and pursue this beautiful phenomenon. I’ve become entranced, my heart slows to a steady rhythmic tempo and my finger relaxes over the shutter as I share in the marvel of nature. It is captivating and exhilarating to witness the blazing glow of the sun as it lays itself to sleep below the horizon, while we here on Earth continue to rotate and life awaits a new dawn.

Pondering, stewing in thoughts of visual renderings time and again contemplating how best to capture the object of my attention under such circumstances, I’m affixed. The sinking sun will whisk away the occurrences of the day and in its grasp we release the ecstasy and melancholy to begin anew.

Suddenly darkness creeps in and around me, an all-encompassing veil with its promises of the magic that a new evening brings. Yet, those lovely ideas of rendering creativity through this intense composition allow me to rest soothingly. For the summer sun will continue to blaze and restore the sky with another piece of fine art for me to capture.

Adieu, soleil.